How Long Does It Take to Get Used to Running? Ways to Stay Motivated

How long does it take to get used to running?

How long does it take to get used to running? Running gets easier the more you do it, which can take some weeks to months depending on your individual physical fitness level.

Lacing up your running shoes and hitting the trail can be very satisfying. However, if you aren’t acclimated to this type of exercise, you might wonder when you’ll start to feel comfortable with doing it.

So, how long does it take to get used to running? This largely depends on numerous factors like your age, previous fitness level, and current weight. Having good running shoes that fit your feet can also make a difference, too.

The bottom line is that running is the same as some other forms of physical activity. The more you do it, the easier it is for your muscles to acclimate to the process. Keeping a consistent routine ensures that it steadily gets easier over time.

However, most people can expect one to two months of consistency before noticing results with a high comfort level by month six.

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Running for Fitness and Overall Wellness

How Long Does It Take to Get Used to Running?
If you’re considerably overweight or live a very sedentary lifestyle, then you’ll want to start off slowly

If you’re looking for an excellent beginner workout, there’s no better option than running. Why? It’s simple to do, doesn’t require any special equipment other than a sturdy pair of shoes, and is free to try out.

However, it can be incredibly taxing on the body. After a single ten to fifteen-minute session, a new runner can feel as though they’ve put in a much more grueling workout. That’s why so many newbies wonder how long it takes to get used to running.

The truth is that you really need to take a good look at your current physical fitness level and health before starting a regimen. If you’re considerably overweight or live a very sedentary lifestyle, then you’ll want to start off slowly. Age is also a factor, too.

Getting Used to Running As A Hobby

When you first start out as a new runner, you’ll want to give your body time to adjust to this new activity. After all, there’s nothing in life where you just start out as an expert on the first try. Running is no exception to this rule.

However, if you’re coming from a place where you’ve had almost zero physical fitness over the last year or more, you’ll want to ease into the process. For example, running in thirty-second intervals and walking for five minutes in between can be a good way to start to acclimate your body to your new fitness hobby.

But what if you have a very physical job or spend a lot of time enjoying other types of movement as part of your daily activities? Then you might not have to start out so slow.

A longer or moderate run three to four days per week for a month should be more than adequate to get your body ready for more vigorous running.

How to Stay Motivated When Getting Used to Running

Tons of people make resolutions to start getting fit and active in January. Then they ditch the whole plan because they aren’t seeing results three weeks in.

To help keep yourself motivated, it is a good idea to focus your efforts on numbers of sessions and not the results you see on the scale or in the mirror. Beginner runners should come up with a running plan and stick to it for as long as possible.

By doing this, you’ll eventually get your body used to the process and start to see changes in your stamina and overall physique.

What to Expect in the First Week of Running

What to Expect in the First Week of Running
The possibilities are endless, but they start with getting through your first week as a novice runner

When you first start running, you’ll likely feel soreness and might even get a blister or two on your feet. This is perfectly normal and almost expected.

However, make sure you aren’t running on two consecutive days. Instead, beginner runners should do some sort of cross-training exercise in between, such as swimming, cycling, yoga, or pilates. And always make sure your hydration needs are being met throughout the day, which can make the exercise process less taxing on your body.

Eventually, you’ll be able to work up to longer training intervals and even long distance running. You might even opt to run in a marathon or train towards a 5K. The possibilities are endless, but they start with getting through your first week as a novice runner.

The Final Word on How Long Does It Take to Get Used to Running

The truth about how long it takes to get used to running really comes down to two factors. First, your current age, weight, and everyday fitness level before you started running. Second, the consistency and perseverance you put forth.

That means it should take somewhere between one to two months of regular sessions before you start feeling somewhat comfortable, with increased ability by six months or so. This timeframe is really different for everyone but still serves as a good guide.

Becoming an avid runner is definitely not easy, but it is one of the more accessible fitness activities you can do. Thus, we recommend that you grab your running shoes, fill up a bottle of water, and start in any method that feels comfortable to you.

FAQs About How Long Does It Take to Get Used to Running

What do you do when you experience a setback with running?

Understand that setbacks can happen with your training at any point. An injury, bad weather, or even a scheduling conflict can really break your focus and consistency. Instead, make sure you get back to your normal routine as soon as you’re healed or the conflict is removed.

How long should you run before seeing results?

The answer to this question varies from one person to another. However, most individuals starting at a low intensity level and working up by running three to four days per week should see very solid results within three months.

Should You Consume a Lot of Carbohydrates Before Running?

This is one of those questions that depends on numerous factors, such as your main intent for working out and the recommendation of your doctor. For example, if you’re on the ketogenic diet or a low carb meal plan prescribed by your physician, you would want to skip this.

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